Category Archives: Roman Blinds

Bypass Patio Door Blinds

Patio furniture sales have been on the rise. The consumer now has more money to spend on creating their dream house and for many, a patio is part of their dream. However would not it be a waste if you could not enjoy your lovely and brand new furniture from inside through your patio door when you wished? But of course you know how difficult those doors can be.

You want something stylish to serve the purposes that well… blinds offer! Bifold and bypass track systems are becoming a consumer favorite for those seeking something unique for their patio doors. Along with those are the new Casing Frame and mounting strips. Now is the time to enjoy your patio through the ease and style of blinds.

In recent years new models of valances have become available and have been specifically designed to work with Bifold and bypass track systems. This is the solution you have been looking for to eliminate those annoying light gaps and even to disguise the often unattractive track and other hardware associated with your blinds. Many valances have been created just for the purpose of being long enough to cover the hardware since the panels do not swing open.

While traditionally one was limited to using the simple and boring L-Frame, today a popular new style is the Casing frame. Even better is now it even comes at many locations in an extended length of ¾’’. And with a colonial look, it gives a classic feel that can be perfect for matching your patio set and gives you the options to fully enjoy the set by allowing fully operational shutters.

Besides the new valances and frames to maximize one’s enjoyment of their patio is the new mounting strips. The inside strip has new options that had been nonexistent I past years. Now it is more likely for one to be able to find different sizes for the installer. This allows one to avoid having to take down the original ¾” x ¾” mounting strip and instead use such options as the 1” x ¾” mounting strip.

Patios are meant to be enjoyed. So go and enjoy them without the hassle of the Patio Doors. All it takes is using some newer options for patio blinds. New styles of track systems, frames and mounting strips allow you to do just that. Why wait any longer?

Roman Blinds: Hand Decorated

Among the most elegant type of blinds as well as another which is easily decorated and adapted to echo the look and feel of any room is the Roman blind.

Easily stenciled or colored they lend themselves well to additional decorating, and hold the fabric paint well, giving the design the ability to last for years with proper care and cleaning.

Roman blinds are by and large room darkening, so the blind being drawn at night to provide for privacy, will also provide for your guests or family to see the designs or decorator edging that you add.

Roman blinds are available in many colors, and using stencils, freehand painting techniques, stippling or stenciling brushes and a few minutes of your time can give you an amazing designer blind that will provide your room with a style that is unsurpassed in those you can purchase.

All it takes is a bit of imagination to make the blind itself echo the border, wallpaper print or the print of your valance.

For example if your home is Amish country or Country French, one of the things you might do is to echo the Amish border that you have in your dining room in this fashion.

Amish Buggy Mural on Roman Blind

Rather than a simple design, a Roman blind may be used to stencil or paint a mural type scene which will be proudly displayed when the blind is fully extended, such as the one viewed here.

Using layered stencils or simply hand painting the lower portion of the blind the effect is extremely striking.

Your windows and blinds can be as unique and unusual as you are, and the price doesn’t have to be astronomical to achieve a designer one of a kind effect, if you are willing to spend a few minutes and a few dollars.

Happy Painting.

How to make a Plain Roman Blind

Once you measured the amount of fabric you will need for the actual creation of your Roman blinds, you can begin the easy and quite fun process of actually making them.

  1. To begin with you need to cut the fabrics to the size required while adding an additional 2 (5 cms) to the width for side seam allowances and 2″ (5 cms) to the length for hem allowances. If a patterned fabric is used, make sure it is cut so the pattern matches up on both sides.
  2. Cut the lining out to precisely math the exact measurements as the upper fabric while leaving out any extra allowance that may have existed for pattern matching.
  3. Take the fabric and lay it down right side up on a flat surface.
  4. Next, lay the lining down flat and on top. Be sure to have them wrong side up and matching up the raw edges. Then smooth out all of the wrinkles and creases and pin the two together.
  5. Stitch and pin down both sides along the bottom edges around 1″ (2.5cms) from the raw edges.
  6. Trim the bottom two corners and proceed to make a second row of stitches across the bottom, 0.25 (6 mm) in from the raw edge. Between the channels, between the 2 rows of stitches, insert a dowel.
  7. Take out all of the pins. Next, turn the blinds right side out.
  8. Press the blinds and press out and flatten the seams.
  9. Place the blind on a flat surface and again, pin the two layers together.
  10. 2″ (5 cms) down from the top raw edge, use a pencil and draw a line across the width of the line.
  11. Divide the rest of the length of the blind into equal sections (between 8″ and 12″ (20 and 30cms)) with a half section at the bottom edge and mark.
  12. Using a pencil, draw lines across the blind at those marks. The lines should be parallel to the edge at the top and be right angles to the sides. This ill make sewing lines for the pockets.
  13. To develop he pockets that will be needed to hold up the dowel, cut some strips of lining fabric3″ (7.5 cms) wide and as long as the blind is wide. Cut 1 strip for each whole pleat.
  14. Fold every strip in half (width ways) right sides together and matching the raw edges.
  15. Now, machine stitch across one end and down the length 0.5″ (12mm) in from the one raw edge.
  16. Turn it right side out and press it.
  17. Pin the folded side of the pockets onto the pencil lines you drew.
  18. Sew the pockets onto the blind at these marked lines.
  19. Slide a wooden dowelling into each pocket and sew the open ends.
  20. Hand sew the plastic rings to the outer edges of the pockets.
  21. Turn down 1″ (2.5 cms) to the wrong side, at the top edge and press.
  22. Stitch and pin the sew side of the Velcro across the top and on the wrong side. Close it to the fold. Stitch both sides the same direction.
  23. Hang the blind by pressing the two Velcro pieces together.
  24. Screw an eyelet into the underside of the batten directly above each line of rings on the blind and 1 at the end of the batten to the side that the blind will be operated from.
  25. Cut the nylon cord into three and knot one length to a bottom ring. Through each line of rings, thread the chords. Through the eyes on the batten taking all three cords to one side of the window.
  26. Trim the end of the cords level. Then thread them into the acorn and knot them.
  27. Position a cleat at a convenient height.
  28. Pull up the blind, winding the cords round the cleat.

How to make Roman Blinds

Roman blinds are one of the most popular styles of blinds today. Due to their design and refreshing look, they are often known as one of the most stylish ways to decorate a window. What is even nicer is they can be made from many a material and weight of fabric. Now it will be revealed how to estimate the fabric quantity needed to make your dream blinds.

Fabric, Lining – Strips of wooden or plastic dowelling, 1.25″ (3 cms) less than the blind’s width.
Small plastic rings, approximately 0.5″ (12mm) in diameter.
Wooden or brass acorn.

Nylon cord, 3 x (twice the length of the blind + the width of blind).
Wall cleat.

Stick and sew Velcro enough for the width of the blind.
Wooden Batten approx 1” (2.5cms) x 1” (2.5 cms) x the width of the finished blind.
4 screw eyelets.

Estimating the Fabric Quantity

1. Place and secure the blind track or wooden batten in position. Fix the blind to the top of the window frame.

2. Attach the adhesive side of the Velcro to the edge (front) of the batten

3. Measure from the top of the track or batten to a chosen length. Add some allowance for the hem to be made or for pattern matching

4. The length of the lining will be the same as the fabric requirements

5. To find the width of fabric needed, measure the track or batten and again allow for the necessary seam allowance. Divide this number by the width of the fabric and round up to the next whole number.

6. The amount of widths of lining required will be equal to the number of widths needed for fabric

How to make a Plain Roman Blind:

Once you measured the amount of fabric you will need for the actual creation of your Roman blinds, you can begin the easy and quite fun process of actually making them.

1. To begin with you need to cut the fabrics to the size required while adding an additional 2” (5 cms) to the width for side seam allowances and 2″ (5 cms) to the length for hem allowances. If a patterned fabric is used, make sure it is cut so the pattern matches up on both sides.

2. Cut the lining out to precisely math the exact measurements as the upper fabric while leaving out any extra allowance that may of existed for pattern matching.

3. Take the fabric and lay it down right side up on a flat surface.

4. Next, lay the lining down flat and on top. Be sure to have them wrong side up and matching up the raw edges. Then smooth out all of the wrinkles and creases and pin the two together.

5. Stitch and pin down both sides along the bottom edges around 1″ (2.5cms) from the raw edges.

6. Trim the bottom two corners and proceed to make a second row of stitches across the bottom, 0.25” (6 mm) in from the raw edge. Between the channel, between the 2 rows of stitches, insert a dowel.

7. Take out all of the pins. Next, turn the blinds right side out.

8. Press the blinds and press out and flatten the seams.

9. Place the blind on a flat surface and again, pin the two layers together.

10. 2″ (5 cms) down from the top raw edge, use a pencil and draw a line across the width of the line.

11. Divide the rest of the length of the blind into equal sections (between 8″ and 12″ (20 and 30cms)) with a half section at the bottom edge and mark.

12. Using a pencil, draw lines across the blind at those marks. The lines should be parallel to the edge at the top and be right angles to the sides. This ill make sewing lines for the pockets.

13. To develop he pockets that will be needed to hold up the dowel, cut some strips of lining fabric 3″ (7.5 cms) wide and as long as the blind is wide. Cut 1 strip for each whole pleat.

14. Fold every strip in half (width ways) right sides together and matching the raw edges.

15. Now, machine stitch across one end and down the length 0.5″ (12mm) in from the one raw edge.

16. Turn it right side out and press it.

17. Pin the folded side of the pockets onto the pencil lines you drew.

18. Sew the pockets onto the blind at these marked lines.

19. Slide a wooden dowelling into each pocket and sew the open ends.

20. Hand sew the plastic rings to the outer edges of the pockets.

21. Turn down 1″ (2.5 cms) to the wrong side, at the top edge and press.

22. Stitch and pin the sew side of the Velcro across the top and on the wrong side. Close it to the fold. Stitch both sides the same direction.

23. Hang the blind by pressing the two Velcro pieces together.

24. Screw an eyelet into the underside of the batten directly above each line of rings on the blind and 1 at the end of the batten to the side that the blind will be operated from.

25. Cut the nylon cord into three and knot one length to a bottom ring. Through each line of rings, thread the chords. Through the eyes on the batten taking all three cords to one side of the window.

26. Trim the end of the cord’s level. Then thread them into the acorn and knot them.

27. Position a cleat at a convenient height.

28. Pull up the blind, winding the cords round the cleat.